The word Eid in Arabic means: “a gathering of a group at any day.” It also means “to return” which indicates that this day returns every year. From an Islamic perspective, Eid is the day Muslims celebrate an act of worship. Eid Al-Adha, the celebration of sacrifice on the tenth of Dhul-Hijjah, comes after finishing the major acts of Hajj. Eid Al-Fitr, the celebration of breaking fast on the first of Shawwal, comes after finishing fasting the month of Ramadan.

Eid for Muslims is an act of worship toward Allah (SW). Allah (SW) said: {For each [faith] –community We have appointed [sacred] rites, so that they may mention the name of God.} 22:34. Eid Al-Fitr and Al-Adha are the only two Eids celebrated in Islam.

When the prophet (SAAW) came to Madinah, he found that people used to celebrate two days during Jahiliyya, time of ignorance. He said: “I came to you and you have two days you celebrated during (Jahiliyya) and Allah has substituted for you better days: the Day of Sacrifice and the Day of breaking Fast.[1]

This is Our Eid:

Allah (SW) said: {For each nation we have appointed rites which they perform.} This is indeed our Eid in which our identity and character as Muslims prevail.

We are blessed to have the chance to come back and pray together as a community during Eid Al-Adha, which will be Tuesday July 20, 2021. We have already reserved the Tinley Park Convention Center and are looking forward to seeing you all there, insha Allah. The timings for Eid prayers will be announced later in a separate email.

Sh. Kifah Mustapha

[1] Ahmad